We were connected world wide and all things started and finished with Whitehall Wireless [callsign GYA] which is sited in central London at the top of the Mall. . From here, all long haul communications were met by using RATT [Radio Automatic Tele Type] circuits known as Fixed Services [FX] of which most were continuous and a few part time on a scheduled basis. Whitehall Wireless did not talk directly to ships.  Portishead Radio, near Bristol, a GPO [General Post Office] civilian station received messages from ships at sea and sent them by land line to Whitehall Wireless. Portishead Radio had a small staff of RN Telegraphists who were employed on general duties receiving signals from luxury liners as well as from warships. Whitehall Wireless also ran the messages to ships at sea system, the Fleet CW [Morse Code] Broadcasts and later the RATT Broadcasts, as well as the Submarine Broadcast keying the remote transmitters of RUGBY or/and CRIGGION both of which were GPO civilian transmitter stations. Remote Naval transmitters and receiver stations many miles from London sent and received  Whitehall Wireless traffic [in/out from/to] around the world. Signals from ships deployed around the world were received on CW [Morse Code] ship-shore frequencies in places like Malta, Mauritius, Ceylon, Singapore, Hong Kong plus a whole host of other allied Radio Stations,  and passed back to Whitehall Wireless over the 100 WPM [75 baud] RATT fixed service links. Many of these stations ran and controlled their own area Broadcasts CW/RATT for ships deployed in or transitting through their areas. Below, mainly from the good memory of John Eilbeck, I list some of the most important radio callsigns of our time, and their simple three letter devices haunt me with the thoughts of yester-year and the countless number of times I called to talk to these stations. It befell to my generation to say goodbye to MORSE CODE and to welcome in RATT, and from there, the fancy modulation techniques required for high speed Satellite Circuits both speech and data.  Personally, I remember the days when Morse code was king and we operator's prince's, taking enormous pride in our personal ability to send and receiving signals.  There was something romantic about the whole ethos, and never more so than when 'talking' to somebody on the other side of the world; in a different time zone; a different climate, one-to-one, and whether allowed or not, adding a 'cu om' {see you old man} at the end of my signal, often reluctant to say goodbye, manifest in having  the last dit-dit on the key, symbolic of a don't-let-go hand shake. Anyway here they are:-

RADIO CALLSIGN

STATION AND FACILITY

 

4SI

Ceylon [later years]

ARL

Karachi

ARM

Chittagong

CFH

Halifax

CKN

Esquimalt Vancouver

GBR

Rugby Submarine CW Broadcast VLF

GKH GKL GKG GKS GKI GKV

Portishead Radio [GPO Station] Ship-Shore

GXO

Mauritius

GXW

Portland

GYA

Whitehall RATT Fleet Broadcast

GYB

Whitehall RATT  Fleet Broadcast

GYC

Whitehall CW Fleet Broadcast

GYL/GYS

Singapore

GYQ 

HMS Dolphin, submarine base Gosport Hampshire UK. Submarine Ops and Safety frequency 4340 kHz was manned continuously.

GYX

Malta

GZO

Hong Kong

GZP

Ceylon West Trincomalee

MGK

Londonderry

MTI

Plymouth

MTL

Chatham

MTN

Portsmouth

MTO

Rosyth

VHK

Canberra

VHM

Darwin

VPT Malta Commercial. Malta Navy [GYX] could accept any commercial traffic from any ship for any address, known as QSP, except for Maltese addresses where VPT had to be used.

VIS

Sydney

VTF

Bombay

VTO

Vishakhapatnam

ZLB

Awarua

ZLE

Auckland

ZLO

Irrirangi

ZLP

Wellington

ZSJ

Capetown

   1953 Long Distance Ship-Shore Radio Communications map showing the EIGHT main stations as being Halifax, Portishead, Cape Town, Singapore, Ceylon,  Sydney, Wellington and Vancouver, and the other SIX minor or supplementary receiving stations.