Hello Folks, and welcome to the KEY to seeing the 1952 RN SHIPS and their Callsigns.

I read so many books about the navy and ship's, which always show you every detail possible including colour [which differed station on station] and pennant numbers which were often not used or blanked out by camouflage paint, but NEVER include the ships second name, namely its RADIO CALLSIGN.  This little page rectifies that omission.

 

AB

B

BC

CDEF

FGHIJKL

LM

M1

M2

M3

M4

M5

MN

NOPQR

RS

ST

TU UW

WZ

Of course, with only one or two exceptions, most of these ships saw the war years.  In the 1930's Britain had the use of the letters B, G and M for British ships, and other letters for British Commonwealth [Colonies] ships.  During WW2 many British Warships had a callsign beginning with the letter 'B', the rest starting with a 'G' and later on, with the letter 'M'. This lasted until approximately 1948-49 when China was given the letter 'B' for its use, meaning that all British warships now began with either the letter 'G' or the letter 'M'.  This list therefore heralds in a new era of W/T callsigns.  I do hope that some of our older readers get enjoyment out of seeing their old ships mentioned with their callsigns, and if you want to see the pre change-over callsign [if it began with a 'B'] give me a call, OR HAVE A LOOK AT THIS FILE .  Get 'tapping' and let the memories flow.  Apart from many years of RADIO SILENCE, how many times did you send your callsign?  Nine out of ten sailors were [are] experts at bending the arm at the elbow, but we were just as good at bending it at the wrist! [as well as at the elbow of course].

The grid above show the letter or letters covering the first letter of a ship name.

SEE ALSO THESE TWO SITES:

THE NAVY AND ITS CHANGES DURING MY 30 YEAR CAREER 1953

warship radio callsigns of the 1970's

 

Click on the grid windows to take you to your vessel, and good sailing gentlemen.  Yours Aye.